Arrow annotation in GIMP.

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Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Peter Easthope

Hi,

Can anyone recommend a means for adding an arrow to
an image in GIMP?

The article here describes something called ArrowsCreator.
https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/44797/how-do-i-insert-arrows-into-a-picture-in-gimp
Is it advisable?

Any other recommendations?

Thanks,                           ... P.



--
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Oberon
Tel: +1 604 670 0140            Bcc: peter at easthope. ca

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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Cindy Sue Causey

On 8/13/19, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Can anyone recommend a means for adding an arrow to
> an image in GIMP?
>
> The article here describes something called ArrowsCreator.
> https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/44797/how-do-i-insert-arrows-into-a-picture-in-gimp
> Is it advisable?
>
> Any other recommendations?


Hi, Peter.. I played with this a little bit and also installed a font
viewer which was already a to-do item. Gnome-font-viewer. Super simple.
It apparently opens up in the font directory.

Dingbats had a few various arrows. The file I found for it has Adobe's
name on it, adobe-dingbats, but I can't figure out when it's pulled
into my debootstraps. It should be from the main repository, most
likely.

If that Adobe name is a deal-breaker because of e.g. copyrights or
something, your webpage there reminded me that you can do a key
combination that lets you draw a PERFECT straight line.

I just tested it with the "pencil tool" and one of the acrylic
"brushes" for its tip. That gave it a "chalkboard chalk" outer edge.
The star brush gives you kind of a sawtooth look, by the way. :)

My sample came out well enough that I added it as my own brush, grin.
Their instructions worked just as written there. I'd forgotten we can
create our own brushes.

Mine's imperfectly shaped using that option of clicking the first
point, next click AND HOLD "shift" then click your second point... And
move-cursor-&-click and move-cursor-&-click until you get whatever shape
you want then release the shift key when you're finished.

If you do freehand but still want it symmetrical, you could draw the
first half, copy & paste a copy, flip that copy, and line it up to make
the whole arrow.

Have fun!

Cindy :)

PS My apologies if this reply warps anything. I'm replying through the
Lists webpage to see if that works properly on my end.

For one thing, I haven't seen a line count toggle anywhere (yet). It's
bringing up memories of a thread about that very topic from quite a
while back. :)

--
Cindy-Sue Causey
Talking Rock, Pickens County, Georgia, USA

* runs with birdseed *

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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Dan Ritter-4
In reply to this post by Peter Easthope
[hidden email] wrote:

>
> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a means for adding an arrow to
> an image in GIMP?
>
> The article here describes something called ArrowsCreator.
> https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/44797/how-do-i-insert-arrows-into-a-picture-in-gimp
> Is it advisable?
>
> Any other recommendations?

Open a new image. Set the background to transparent. Draw an
arrow. Save it. Don't close it.

Open your primary image. Figure out where the arrow goes. Create
a new layer on top. Cut and paste the arrow into the primary
image. Move it around until you like it. Save. Export to the
format you want.

Next time you want an arrow, you've already got the same one, so
you can be consistent.

-dsr-

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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Peter Easthope
In reply to this post by Peter Easthope
BEGIN TEDIOUS ASIDE
For the header for this message I copied References holus-bolus and
appended the Message-id from the Web page. I understand David's
suggestion of including In-Repy-To rather than References but can
afford a few extra ms for References.  In-Reply-To is the last
parameter of References; therefore References contains all the
information that In-Reply-To does; therefore nothing is lost by
supplying References and not In-Reply-To.  We'll see how the header
for this message comes out.  =8~|

The case specificity of In-Reply-To rather than In-reply-to appears to
be unnecessary but that is what the IETF chose.  So the mailing list
software could stick to that. Putting In-reply-to on the Web pages is
just another source of distraction and confusion.
END TEDIOUS ASIDE

* From: Dan Ritter
* Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 08:26:18 -0400
> Open a new image. Set the background to transparent. Draw an
> arrow. Save it. Don't close it.
>
> Open your primary image. ...

OK, thanks.  That method is entirely serviceable.

              ... P.
             
--
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Oberon
Tel: +1 604 670 0140            Bcc: peter at easthope. ca

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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Eduardo M KALINOWSKI-4
On qua, 14 ago 2019, peter wrote:

> BEGIN TEDIOUS ASIDE
> For the header for this message I copied References holus-bolus and
> appended the Message-id from the Web page. I understand David's
> suggestion of including In-Repy-To rather than References but can
> afford a few extra ms for References.  In-Reply-To is the last
> parameter of References; therefore References contains all the
> information that In-Reply-To does; therefore nothing is lost by
> supplying References and not In-Reply-To.  We'll see how the header
> for this message comes out.  =8~|
>
> The case specificity of In-Reply-To rather than In-reply-to appears to
> be unnecessary but that is what the IETF chose.  So the mailing list
> software could stick to that. Putting In-reply-to on the Web pages is
> just another source of distraction and confusion.
> END TEDIOUS ASIDE

Or you could use any modern MUA that does all that automatically and  
is not prone to errors.

--
Eduardo M KALINOWSKI
[hidden email]


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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Tom Browder
In reply to this post by Peter Easthope
On Tue, Aug 13, 2019 at 20:51 <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi,

Can anyone recommend a means for adding an arrow to
an image in GIMP?

The article here describes something called ArrowsCreator.
https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/44797/how-do-i-insert-arrows-into-a-picture-in-gimp
Is it advisable?

Any other recommendations?

If you're adventurous and want to be able to add more overlays to images you could use ImageMagick and write a wrapper program to do exactly what you wish. I have done so using Perl 6 (aka Raku) and plan to make it public when I get the time.

Check out https://perl6.org for more info on the language.

Best regards,

-Tom
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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

David Wright-3
In reply to this post by Peter Easthope
On Wed 14 Aug 2019 at 07:24:58 (-0700), [hidden email] wrote:

> BEGIN TEDIOUS ASIDE
> For the header for this message I copied References holus-bolus and
> appended the Message-id from the Web page. I understand David's
> suggestion of including In-Repy-To rather than References but can
> afford a few extra ms for References.  In-Reply-To is the last
> parameter of References; therefore References contains all the
> information that In-Reply-To does; therefore nothing is lost by
> supplying References and not In-Reply-To.  We'll see how the header
> for this message comes out.  =8~|
>
> The case specificity of In-Reply-To rather than In-reply-to appears to
> be unnecessary but that is what the IETF chose.  So the mailing list
> software could stick to that. Putting In-reply-to on the Web pages is
> just another source of distraction and confusion.

If you want to write iN-rePLy-to, go ahead. The web pages will massage
it into the same Capitalised style however you happen to write it; it
will perform its function just as well.

Many people on this list post emails containing In-reply-to, and that
*is* the commonest alternative to In-Reply-To, as might be expected.
https://lists.debian.org/debian-user/2015/03/msg00059.html
is the only instance of a saved email containing in-reply-to that I
happen to have a copy of, and you can see that the Debian web page
threaded it correctly.

Said email was emitted by the Atmail 6.6.0.13042 mailer, which google
seems to show is more frequently used in Australia. My email hosting
provider retired Atmail in favour of RoundCube back in 2014, or so I read.

> END TEDIOUS ASIDE

Cheers,
David.

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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

Peter Easthope
In reply to this post by Dan Ritter-4
From: Dan Ritter
Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 08:26:18 -0400
> Set the background to transparent.

Menus: Layer > Tranparency > Add Alpha Channel. The new viewer remains
black.  Might be transparent. Might not.  (If all else fails, will see
what happens when the arrow is dropped on the image layer.  If the
result has the appearance of the arrow layer, the arrow background is
not transparent and my image is obscured.)

Really I don't understand the representation used in GIMP. From what
I've read, there are three channels, R, G, B.  OK.  Plus an optional
4th, alpha. What is it?

What is the point of alpha? Transparent should be simply no marking.  
RGB = (0,0,0). What does alpha represent?  

Thanks,                         ... P.

--
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Oberon
Tel: +1 604 670 0140            Bcc: peter at easthope. ca

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Re: Arrow annotation in GIMP.

tomas@tuxteam.de
On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 10:40:59AM -0700, [hidden email] wrote:
> From: Dan Ritter
> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 08:26:18 -0400
> > Set the background to transparent.
>

[...]

> Really I don't understand the representation used in GIMP. From what
> I've read, there are three channels, R, G, B.  OK.  Plus an optional
> 4th, alpha. What is it?

There are four: RGBA -- [1] should address your other questions. The
alpha channel is useful when you overlay images (like in your arrow
case): you want the arrow be "on top" of your image, but you don't
want the arrow's background obscuring the rest of your image.

You could achieve that with a "mask" (an array of bits of your image's
size with an 1 for each "relevant" pixel and a 0 for each "irrelevant"
one). This is an alpha channel with one bit depth. A deeper alpha
channel allows semi-transparency, where the foreground image could,
for example, merge "softly" into the background.

A neat effect would be to make your arrow semi-transparent: you
would still see through, as if the arrow was smoked glass.

Best you play with that under Gimp, then you'll "get" it quickly.

Cheers

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RGBA
-- t

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