Diagnosing what applications are doing

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Diagnosing what applications are doing

Paul Sutton-2
Hi

On my netbook,  Thunderbird seems really unstable, it stars up fine then
seems to stall and fails to respond,  it eventually picks up.  I usually
goto a terminal and type killall thunderbird.

I can usually also minimise thunderbird, but maximising it, ends up with
the top of the application bar only and the rest of the application is
not maximised properly.

Is there a program that I can run to try and figure out what it is doing
?  I am sure there is but not sure what I would be looking for even with
searching.

In a similar way to using time,  which tells how long a program has run
for,  I guess I need some sort of memory or cpu trace to see what
Thunderbird is doing to behave this way.

Chances are it will be rather incomprehensible, but at least it could be
something I can post here, ( well pastebin if huge output ) so others
can take a look.

In the meantime I have removed my usenet account from the netbook, as i
don't use it,  on the netbook enough to justify having. 

Thanks

Paul

--
Paul Sutton
http://www.zleap.net
https://www.linkedin.com/in/zleap/
gnupg : 7D6D B682 F351 8D08 1893  1E16 F086 5537 D066 302D

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Jonas Smedegaard-2
Quoting Paul Sutton (2019-05-26 12:28:43)

> On my netbook,  Thunderbird seems really unstable, it stars up fine
> then seems to stall and fails to respond,  it eventually picks up.  I
> usually goto a terminal and type killall thunderbird.
>
> I can usually also minimise thunderbird, but maximising it, ends up
> with the top of the application bar only and the rest of the
> application is not maximised properly.
>
> Is there a program that I can run to try and figure out what it is
> doing ?  I am sure there is but not sure what I would be looking for
> even with searching.
>
> In a similar way to using time,  which tells how long a program has
> run for,  I guess I need some sort of memory or cpu trace to see what
> Thunderbird is doing to behave this way.
>
> Chances are it will be rather incomprehensible, but at least it could
> be something I can post here, ( well pastebin if huge output ) so
> others can take a look.
>
> In the meantime I have removed my usenet account from the netbook, as
> i don't use it,  on the netbook enough to justify having. 
To monitor in real time what steal most ressources, install and run
atop. Hit C/M/D/N to sort by cpu/memory/disk/net, or A to auto-sort.

To monitor both in real time and collect data in the background to later
analysis (e.g. to examine past minutes _after_ Thunderbird has crashed),
install pcp and run "pcp atop" for real time view

To inspect what happens with Thunderbird itself, I guess you should look
in the menus of the application for ways to open a log window...


 - Jonas

--
 * Jonas Smedegaard - idealist & Internet-arkitekt
 * Tlf.: +45 40843136  Website: http://dr.jones.dk/

 [x] quote me freely  [ ] ask before reusing  [ ] keep private

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Reco
In reply to this post by Paul Sutton-2
        Hi.

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 11:28:43AM +0100, Paul Sutton wrote:
> Is there a program that I can run to try and figure out what it is doing
> ?  I am sure there is but not sure what I would be looking for even with
> searching.

perf trace -p <thunderbird pid here>

ltrace -p <thunderbird pid here>

strace -p <thunderbird pid here>

There are more sophisticated tools for the task, but these three are
usually enough for me.

Reco

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Paul Sutton-2

On 26/05/2019 12:32, Reco wrote:

> Hi.
>
> On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 11:28:43AM +0100, Paul Sutton wrote:
>> Is there a program that I can run to try and figure out what it is doing
>> ?  I am sure there is but not sure what I would be looking for even with
>> searching.
> perf trace -p <thunderbird pid here>
>
> ltrace -p <thunderbird pid here>
>
> strace -p <thunderbird pid here>
>
> There are more sophisticated tools for the task, but these three are
> usually enough for me.
>
> Reco


Great stuff,  than you for all this, will install those packages and try
figure out what thunderbird is up to.

Regards

Paul

--
Paul Sutton
http://www.zleap.net
https://www.linkedin.com/in/zleap/
gnupg : 7D6D B682 F351 8D08 1893  1E16 F086 5537 D066 302D

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Gene Heskett-4
In reply to this post by Jonas Smedegaard-2
On Sunday 26 May 2019 07:05:45 am Jonas Smedegaard wrote:

> Quoting Paul Sutton (2019-05-26 12:28:43)
>
> > On my netbook,  Thunderbird seems really unstable, it stars up fine
> > then seems to stall and fails to respond,  it eventually picks up. 
> > I usually goto a terminal and type killall thunderbird.
> >
> > I can usually also minimise thunderbird, but maximising it, ends up
> > with the top of the application bar only and the rest of the
> > application is not maximised properly.
> >
> > Is there a program that I can run to try and figure out what it is
> > doing ?  I am sure there is but not sure what I would be looking for
> > even with searching.
> >
> > In a similar way to using time,  which tells how long a program has
> > run for,  I guess I need some sort of memory or cpu trace to see
> > what Thunderbird is doing to behave this way.
> >
> > Chances are it will be rather incomprehensible, but at least it
> > could be something I can post here, ( well pastebin if huge output )
> > so others can take a look.
> >
> > In the meantime I have removed my usenet account from the netbook,
> > as i don't use it,  on the netbook enough to justify having.
>
> To monitor in real time what steal most ressources, install and run
> atop. Hit C/M/D/N to sort by cpu/memory/disk/net, or A to auto-sort.
>
> To monitor both in real time and collect data in the background to
> later analysis (e.g. to examine past minutes _after_ Thunderbird has
> crashed), install pcp and run "pcp atop" for real time view
>
> To inspect what happens with Thunderbird itself, I guess you should
> look in the menus of the application for ways to open a log window...
>
One thing that will "freeze" it is using its own download facilities to
fetch the mail, used to bug me pretty badly, but when it did come back,
everything I had typed into a message came back with it.  So I offloaded
that fetching of emails by making fetchmail, procmail, clamscan and
spamassassin  all into background tasks that have minimal effect on
kmail.  Now my freezes are maybe a second as it sorts an incoming email
that has servived the spam and viri filters.

I can elaborate if there is interest,
>
>  - Jonas


Cheers, Gene Heskett
--
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
 soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Jonas Smedegaard-2
Quoting Gene Heskett (2019-05-26 16:25:43)
> On Sunday 26 May 2019 07:05:45 am Jonas Smedegaard wrote:
>
> > Quoting Paul Sutton (2019-05-26 12:28:43)
> > > On my netbook,  Thunderbird seems really unstable, it stars up
> > > fine then seems to stall and fails to respond,  it eventually
> > > picks up. 
[...]
> One thing that will "freeze" it is using its own download facilities
> to fetch the mail, used to bug me pretty badly, but when it did come
> back, everything I had typed into a message came back with it.  So I
> offloaded that fetching of emails by making fetchmail, procmail,
> clamscan and spamassassin all into background tasks that have minimal
> effect on kmail.  Now my freezes are maybe a second as it sorts an
> incoming email that has servived the spam and viri filters.

Good point!  (this is Thunderbird not KMail but still applies)

For IMAP mail, I recommend more modern alternatives to fetchmail:

  * pullimap
  * offlineimap

(there are more alternatives that I don't recommend)


  - Jonas

--
 * Jonas Smedegaard - idealist & Internet-arkitekt
 * Tlf.: +45 40843136  Website: http://dr.jones.dk/

 [x] quote me freely  [ ] ask before reusing  [ ] keep private

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Erik Josefsson
On 5/26/19 4:36 PM, Jonas Smedegaard wrote:
Quoting Gene Heskett (2019-05-26 16:25:43)
On Sunday 26 May 2019 07:05:45 am Jonas Smedegaard wrote:

Quoting Paul Sutton (2019-05-26 12:28:43)
On my netbook,  Thunderbird seems really unstable, it stars up 
fine then seems to stall and fails to respond,  it eventually 
picks up. 
[...]
One thing that will "freeze" it is using its own download facilities 
to fetch the mail, used to bug me pretty badly, but when it did come 
back, everything I had typed into a message came back with it.  So I 
offloaded that fetching of emails by making fetchmail, procmail, 
clamscan and spamassassin all into background tasks that have minimal 
effect on kmail.  Now my freezes are maybe a second as it sorts an 
incoming email that has servived the spam and viri filters.
Good point!  (this is Thunderbird not KMail but still applies)

For IMAP mail, I recommend more modern alternatives to fetchmail:

  * pullimap
  * offlineimap

Could you recommend one of them to use with an install of the box-add-gui alternative for Teres-I? 

As far as I can see, pullimap needs libconfig-tiny-perl and libinterimap, and offlineimap needs python-imaplib2 and python-socks.

Perhaps one is more lightweight than the other?

Best regards.

//Erik

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Jonas Smedegaard-2
Quoting Erik Josefsson (2019-06-15 08:24:40)

> On 5/26/19 4:36 PM, Jonas Smedegaard wrote:
> > Quoting Gene Heskett (2019-05-26 16:25:43)
> >> On Sunday 26 May 2019 07:05:45 am Jonas Smedegaard wrote:
> >>> Quoting Paul Sutton (2019-05-26 12:28:43)
> >>>> On my netbook,  Thunderbird seems really unstable, it stars up
> >>>> fine then seems to stall and fails to respond,  it eventually
> >>>> picks up.
> > [...]
> >> One thing that will "freeze" it is using its own download
> >> facilities to fetch the mail, used to bug me pretty badly, but when
> >> it did come back, everything I had typed into a message came back
> >> with it.  So I offloaded that fetching of emails by making
> >> fetchmail, procmail, clamscan and spamassassin all into background
> >> tasks that have minimal effect on kmail.  Now my freezes are maybe
> >> a second as it sorts an incoming email that has servived the spam
> >> and viri filters.
> > Good point!  (this is Thunderbird not KMail but still applies)
> >
> > For IMAP mail, I recommend more modern alternatives to fetchmail:
> >
> >    * pullimap
> >    * offlineimap
Correction: My recommendations are _interimap_ and offlineimap.

pullimap is related to interimap but does a different task of
client-side sending emails from an IMAP folder, e.g. on a self-hosted
server with IMAP service but no SMTP service (SMTP is more complex to
self-host due to spam and domain registry challenges).


> Could you recommend one of them to use with an install of the
> box-add-gui alternative for Teres-I?

I recommend them for use with Debian systems, regardless of how they
were bootstrapped.

I have not yet used interimap myself, but have high expectations for its
quality and encouraged its author to get it packaged for Debian a year
ago, where I sought advice from him on my own Dovecot-specific sync
scripts and he told about interimap being developed but not in Debian.  
He actually lives in Sweden like you, Erik. :-)

When I get around to using it myself I will likely add it to one of the
addon profiles of the https://box.redpill.dk/ images but not the gui
profile specifically: It is a command-line tool, not graphical.


> As far as I can see, pullimap needs libconfig-tiny-perl and
> libinterimap, and offlineimap needs python-imaplib2 and python-socks.
>
> Perhaps one is more lightweight than the other?

interimap should be more efficient but requires a good IMAP server like
Dovecot (see package description) whereas offlineimap works with a wider
variety of servers including Gmail.


 - Jonas

--
 * Jonas Smedegaard - idealist & Internet-arkitekt
 * Tlf.: +45 40843136  Website: http://dr.jones.dk/

 [x] quote me freely  [ ] ask before reusing  [ ] keep private

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Re: Diagnosing what applications are doing

Erik Josefsson
On 6/15/19 9:27 AM, Jonas Smedegaard wrote:
When I get around to using it myself I will likely add it to one of the 
addon profiles of the https://box.redpill.dk/ images but not the gui 
profile specifically: It is a command-line tool, not graphical.


As far as I can see, pullimap needs libconfig-tiny-perl and 
libinterimap, and offlineimap needs python-imaplib2 and python-socks.

Perhaps one is more lightweight than the other?
interimap should be more efficient but requires a good IMAP server like 
Dovecot (see package description) whereas offlineimap works with a wider 
variety of servers including Gmail.

Which email client comes with the Teres-I tui profile?

Maybe I should just start to use that and drop gui email when I have learned how to live with tui email.

Best regards.

//Erik