Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

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Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Richard Owlett-3
I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.

TIA


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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Erwan David
/etc/fstab


Le 14/06/2019 à 13:10, Richard Owlett a écrit :
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is
> on. The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used
> for swap.
>
> TIA
>
>
>

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

john doe-6
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
On 6/14/2019 1:10 PM, Richard Owlett wrote:
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
> The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.
>
> TIA
>
>

Maybe:

'/etc/fstab'

--
John Doe

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Erik Christiansen
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
On 14.06.19 06:10, Richard Owlett wrote:
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on. The
> file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.

Easier than looking in /etc/fstab is just running the "mount" command.
The "df" command also includes what you seek in its output.

Erik

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Jonas Smedegaard-2
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Quoting Richard Owlett (2019-06-14 13:10:25)
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is
> on. The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used
> for swap.

/etc/fstab

 - Jonas

--
 * Jonas Smedegaard - idealist & Internet-arkitekt
 * Tlf.: +45 40843136  Website: http://dr.jones.dk/

 [x] quote me freely  [ ] ask before reusing  [ ] keep private

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Richard Owlett-3
In reply to this post by john doe-6
On 06/14/2019 06:20 AM, john doe wrote:

> On 6/14/2019 1:10 PM, Richard Owlett wrote:
>> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
>> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
>> The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.
>>
>> TIA
>>
>>
>
> Maybe:
>
> '/etc/fstab'
>

Thanks.

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Richard Owlett-3
In reply to this post by Erik Christiansen
On 06/14/2019 06:20 AM, Erik Christiansen wrote:

> On 14.06.19 06:10, Richard Owlett wrote:
>> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
>> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on. The
>> file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.
>
> Easier than looking in /etc/fstab is just running the "mount" command.
> The "df" command also includes what you seek in its output.
>
> Erik
>

Thanks. I've never used the df command and I always think of mount as an
action command not as a query.

I just ran the mount command with no options. It gave a fascinating list
that I should probably read about.



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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

songbird
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Richard Owlett wrote:
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
> The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.

  /etc/fstab


  songbird

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Elimar Riesebieter
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
* Richard Owlett <[hidden email]> [2019-06-14 06:10 -0500]:

> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on. The
> file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.

There is a fantastic tool to get an overview of your partitions:

# apt get install dfc

Just read the manpage and get famous info's like from:

$ dfc -WT -q name -sf -d -txfs,nfs,ext4

Elimar
--
  You cannot propel yourself forward by
  patting yourself on the back.

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Pascal Hambourg-2
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Le 14/06/2019 à 13:50, Richard Owlett a écrit :
> On 06/14/2019 06:20 AM, Erik Christiansen wrote:
>> On 14.06.19 06:10, Richard Owlett wrote:
>>> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
>>> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on. The
>>> file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.

Do you want to see the desired or current association ?
/etc/fstab contains the desired filesystem mounts and swaps.
There is no single file containing both mounted filesystems and active
swaps. /proc/mounts or /proc/self/mounts contains mounted filesystems.
/etc/mtab used to be a regular file containing similar information but
is now a symlink to either /proc/mounts or /proc/self/mounts.
/proc/swaps contains active swaps.

>> Easier than looking in /etc/fstab is just running the "mount" command.
>> The "df" command also includes what you seek in its output.

fstab and mount/df do not provide the same kind of information. mount
and df provide information about currently mounted filesystems.
Note that df without argument hides some filesystems (proc, sysfs...)
and bind mounts.

> I just ran the mount command with no options. It gave a fascinating list
> that I should probably read about.

Note that mount without argument merely prints the contents of /proc/mounts.

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Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file

Felix Miata-3
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Richard Owlett composed on 2019-06-14 06:10 (UTC-0500):

> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
> The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.

You might wish to try

        inxi -PpxxaD

You might like better a recent version from unstable or upstream rather than an
antique if you are a Stretch or older user.
--
Evolution as taught in public schools is religion, not science.

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/

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Intended question - was {Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file}

Richard Owlett-3
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
On 06/14/2019 06:10 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
> The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.
>
> TIA
>

The filename I had forgotten was /etc/fstab .

Background:
I have one laptop explicitly set aside for experimenting with Debian in
order to determine *MY* ideal system. To this end I may have a half
dozen copies of Debian to chose from at boot.

For my purposes, the Debian installer has two annoyances:
   1. swap area designation.
      Everything is fine on the 1st installation.
      On following installations, when the existing swap partition is
      is to be used its UUID is changed. This causes grief for the
      other installations by making swap area appear missing. My
      personally preferred solution is to activate swap only of the
      initial installation. For subsequent installs actually requiring
      a swap partition, I edit its /etc/fstab .
   2. Grub configuration.
      The installer is egotistical enough to think that what is being
      installed will always be the preferred version. NOT!
      My solution is install Grub only on the initial install and NO
      boot loader on subsequent install. After completing one (or more)
      additional installs, I boot the first install and run update-grub.

VM's had been suggested ;}


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Bonus answers - was [Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file]

Richard Owlett-3
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
On 06/14/2019 06:10 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
> I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the association
> between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical partition it is on.
> The file I'm looking for also identifies which partition is used for swap.
>
> TIA
>

I was looking for /etc/fstab .

Suggestions were made for tools such as df, mount, and inxi used in an
analytic mode. I either ran them or looked up relevant documentation.

If I had been looking for information one of them could provide, is
there a URL that attempts to summarize such tools?



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Re: Intended question - was {Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file}

Pascal Hambourg-2
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Le 15/06/2019 à 15:15, Richard Owlett a écrit :

>
> I have one laptop explicitly set aside for experimenting with Debian in
> order to determine *MY* ideal system. To this end I may have a half
> dozen copies of Debian to chose from at boot.
>
> For my purposes, the Debian installer has two annoyances:
>    1. swap area designation.
>       Everything is fine on the 1st installation.
>       On following installations, when the existing swap partition is
>       is to be used its UUID is changed. This causes grief for the
>       other installations by making swap area appear missing. My

I agree this is annoying. The Debian installer is not the only one doing
this.

>       personally preferred solution is to activate swap only of the
>       initial installation. For subsequent installs actually requiring
>       a swap partition, I edit its /etc/fstab .

Other workarounds exist :

- If you have plenty of disk space, create a separate swap for each
installation. Or no swap if you don't need it (enough RAM and no
hibernation).

- Use LVM logical volumes instead of plain partitions. When the swap is
in a logical volume, the installer uses its persistent device name
(actually a symlink) /dev/mapper/vgname-lvname instead of its UUID. So
changing the UUID does not disrupt anything. Also, IMO having multiple
test installations is a good use case for LVM as it allows to create,
resize and delete volumes of arbitrary sizes unlike partitions which
require sufficient contiguous disk space or moving partitions around.

>    2. Grub configuration.
>       The installer is egotistical enough to think that what is being
>       installed will always be the preferred version. NOT!

AFAICS, most installers (Linux and others) do the same.

>       My solution is install Grub only on the initial install and NO
>       boot loader on subsequent install. After completing one (or more)
>       additional installs, I boot the first install and run update-grub.

IMO installing GRUB with each system is desirable so that grub.cfg is
generated, as update-grub uses foreign grub.cfg files to properly
retrieve boot parameters.

In legacy mode, you can install GRUB in different locations : main GRUB
in the disk MBR and others in partition boot records. But in legacy mode
the installer does not allow to select a location and name, so at worst
if will overwrite the previous GRUB installed by Debian (if using the
same EFI partition) and at best if will overwrite the EFI boot entry (if
using a different EFI partition). It would be nice if the installer
could offer to define a custom identifier for the boot loader.

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Re: Bonus answers - was [Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file]

songbird
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Richard Owlett wrote:
...
> If I had been looking for information one of them could provide, is
> there a URL that attempts to summarize such tools?

  i go in roughly this order.

command line:
  man -k keyword
  apt-cache search keyword

browser:
  google linux keyword


  songbird

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Re: Intended question

Felix Miata-3
In reply to this post by Pascal Hambourg-2
Pascal Hambourg composed on 2019-06-15 16:22 (UTC+0200):

> in legacy mode
> the installer does not allow to select a location and name...
> ...It would be nice if the installer
> could offer to define a custom identifier for the boot loader.

Unless something has changed lately, a bootloader "location" can be typed in. I
type in /dev/null, the installer errors, then proceeds to successful completion
anyway. I'm booting from a master bootloader, so if the Debian installer fails to
successfully install Grub it's of no consequence here. It would be nice to avoid
the error through an obvious option to select to install no bootloader.
--
Evolution as taught in public schools is religion, not science.

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/

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Re: Intended question

Pascal Hambourg-2
Le 15/06/2019 à 21:10, Felix Miata a écrit :
> Pascal Hambourg composed on 2019-06-15 16:22 (UTC+0200):
>
>> in legacy mode

Oops, I meant in EFI mode.

>> the installer does not allow to select a location and name...
>> ...It would be nice if the installer
>> could offer to define a custom identifier for the boot loader.
>
> Unless something has changed lately, a bootloader "location" can be typed in.

Not in EFI mode. That was my point.

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Re: Intended question - was {Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file}

Richard Owlett-3
In reply to this post by Pascal Hambourg-2
On 06/15/2019 09:22 AM, Pascal Hambourg wrote:

> Le 15/06/2019 à 15:15, Richard Owlett a écrit :
>>
>> I have one laptop explicitly set aside for experimenting with Debian
>> in order to determine *MY* ideal system. To this end I may have a half
>> dozen copies of Debian to chose from at boot.
>>
>> For my purposes, the Debian installer has two annoyances:
>>    1. swap area designation.
>>       Everything is fine on the 1st installation.
>>       On following installations, when the existing swap partition is
>>       is to be used its UUID is changed. This causes grief for the
>>       other installations by making swap area appear missing. My
>
> I agree this is annoying. The Debian installer is not the only one doing
> this.
>
>>       personally preferred solution is to activate swap only of the
>>       initial installation. For subsequent installs actually requiring
>>       a swap partition, I edit its /etc/fstab .
>
> Other workarounds exist :
>
> - If you have plenty of disk space, create a separate swap for each
> installation. Or no swap if you don't need it (enough RAM and no
> hibernation).

I had wondered about something like that. I think I'm more comfortable
with one "largish" partition than several small ones.

>
> - Use LVM logical volumes instead of plain partitions. When the swap is
> in a logical volume, the installer uses its persistent device name
> (actually a symlink) /dev/mapper/vgname-lvname instead of its UUID. So
> changing the UUID does not disrupt anything. Also, IMO having multiple
> test installations is a good use case for LVM as it allows to create,
> resize and delete volumes of arbitrary sizes unlike partitions which
> require sufficient contiguous disk space or moving partitions around.
>

I never noticed anything that attracted my attention to LVM. I will have
to do more reading.

>>    2. Grub configuration.
>>       The installer is egotistical enough to think that what is being
>>       installed will always be the preferred version. NOT!
>
> AFAICS, most installers (Linux and others) do the same.
>
>>       My solution is install Grub only on the initial install and NO
>>       boot loader on subsequent install. After completing one (or more)
>>       additional installs, I boot the first install and run update-grub.
>
> IMO installing GRUB with each system is desirable so that grub.cfg is
> generated, as update-grub uses foreign grub.cfg files to properly
> retrieve boot parameters.

The only thing I've read about multiple GRUBs has been comments on this
list - nothing intentionally organized. As most of the programming I've
done was back when 8085 was new tech, I strongly favor minimal resources.

>
> In legacy mode, you can install GRUB in different locations : main GRUB
> in the disk MBR and others in partition boot records. But in legacy mode
> the installer does not allow to select a location and name, so at worst
> if will overwrite the previous GRUB installed by Debian (if using the
> same EFI partition) and at best if will overwrite the EFI boot entry (if
> using a different EFI partition). It would be nice if the installer
> could offer to define a custom identifier for the boot loader.
>

All my stuff is legacy.




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Re: Bonus answers - was [Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file]

Richard Owlett-3
In reply to this post by songbird
On 06/15/2019 11:55 AM, songbird wrote:

> Richard Owlett wrote:
> ...
>> If I had been looking for information one of them could provide, is
>> there a URL that attempts to summarize such tools?
>
>    i go in roughly this order.
>
> command line:
>    man -k keyword
>    apt-cache search keyword
>
> browser:
>    google linux keyword
>
>
>    songbird
>

You had snipped context. I had said:
"... for *tools such as* df, mount, and inxi used in an analytic mode."
and then:
"... is there a URL that attempts to summarize *such tools* ?"

I was looking for a functional index of tools. Your suggestion works
only if I already know which tool can do the job.




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Re: Bonus answers - was [Re: Forgot name of Debian "configuration" {wrong word?} file]

Jonas Smedegaard-2
In reply to this post by Richard Owlett-3
Quoting Richard Owlett (2019-06-15 15:33:37)

> On 06/14/2019 06:10 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
> > I can't remember the name of the file which identifies the
> > association between a directory (i.e. \home) and which physical
> > partition it is on. The file I'm looking for also identifies which
> > partition is used for swap.
> >
> > TIA
> >
>
> I was looking for /etc/fstab .
>
> Suggestions were made for tools such as df, mount, and inxi used in an
> analytic mode. I either ran them or looked up relevant documentation.
>
> If I had been looking for information one of them could provide, is
> there a URL that attempts to summarize such tools?
You mentioned "directory", "partition", and "swap".

You could use only man-related tools.  Tedious, but possible:

  apropos swap

...lists "mkswap", "swaplabel", "swapoff" and "swapon", among others

  man swapon

...mentions /etc/fstab in its "See also" section (and man pages of other
commands mention swapon in their "See also" section).


I would probably have given up before reaching to a sensible result, and
instead tried a search on https://DuckDuckGo.com/


 - Jonas

--
 * Jonas Smedegaard - idealist & Internet-arkitekt
 * Tlf.: +45 40843136  Website: http://dr.jones.dk/

 [x] quote me freely  [ ] ask before reusing  [ ] keep private

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