Hrdware question

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
25 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Hrdware question

Stephen P. Molnar
I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.

I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.

I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been a
friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA ports are
the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?

Thanks in advance.

--
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D.
Consultant
www.molecular-modeling.net
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

tomas@tuxteam.de
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 11:19:19AM -0400, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>
> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>
> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been
> a friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA
> ports are the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?

I don't know about your board, but usually you can set the boot
priority order in the BIOS. Probably you can use any of the SATA
ports.

Cheers
- -- tomás
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)

iEYEARECAAYFAltvBxMACgkQBcgs9XrR2kbOtwCeN47d5ERCK3llcQlGVHML3vgM
aucAn1UMnpVeZD1+mKNJjhV0mtM7CP6j
=KPKi
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Gene Heskett-4
In reply to this post by Stephen P. Molnar
On Saturday 11 August 2018 11:19:19 Stephen P. Molnar wrote:

> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>
> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>
> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been a
> friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA ports
> are the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
>
Or _0 if it exists. Check dmesg to see whats the first one found.

> Thanks in advance.



--
Cheers, Gene Heskett
--
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
 soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

john doe-6
In reply to this post by Stephen P. Molnar
On 8/11/2018 5:19 PM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>
> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>
> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been a
> friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA ports are
> the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
>

I'm assuming that you have looked at the manuals Asus  MB are well
documented)! :)

Going through the URL (1) without reading the "docs" the SATA internal
ports are apparently "all the same" but you might want to be careful if
you plan to use raid.

1)  https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M5A97_R20/specifications/

--
John Doe

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Stephen P. Molnar

On 08/11/2018 12:22 PM, john doe wrote:

> On 8/11/2018 5:19 PM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
>> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>>
>> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
>> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>>
>> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been
>> a friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA
>> ports are the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
>>
>
> I'm assuming that you have looked at the manuals Asus  MB are well
> documented)! :)
>
> Going through the URL (1) without reading the "docs" the SATA internal
> ports are apparently "all the same" but you might want to be careful
> if you plan to use raid.
>
> 1)  https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M5A97_R20/specifications/
>
I appreciate the responses. I have looked a the MB Manual and the BIOS
in both the easy mode and the advanced mode. (incidentally, the BIOS is
current)

I have three dives on the platform:

  *-cdrom
        description: DVD-RAM writer
        product: DVDRAM GH24NSB0
        vendor: HL-DT-ST
        physical id: 0.0.0
        bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
        logical name: /dev/cdrom
        logical name: /dev/cdrw
        logical name: /dev/dvd
        logical name: /dev/dvdrw
        logical name: /dev/sr0
        version: LN00
        capabilities: removable audio cd-r cd-rw dvd dvd-r dvd-ram
        configuration: ansiversion=5 status=nodisc
   *-disk
        description: ATA Disk
        product: ST2000DM006-2DM1
        vendor: Seagate
        physical id: 0.0.0
        bus info: scsi@2:0.0.0
        logical name: /dev/sda
        version: CC26
        serial: Z560Q2JW
        size: 1863GiB (2TB)
        capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
        configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
sectorsize=4096 signature=0bc7db76
   *-disk
        description: ATA Disk
        product: WDC WD5000AAKS-0
        vendor: Western Digital
        physical id: 0.0.0
        bus info: scsi@3:0.0.0
        logical name: /dev/sdb
        version: 3B01
        serial: WD-WMASY0223768
        size: 465GiB (500GB)
        capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
        configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
sectorsize=512 signature=0003d403

I installed the current Debian Version on the 2TB HD as it was new at
the time.

Unfortunately, the boot sequence on the EZ Mode screen is only shows the
WD 500GB drive and the cdrom drive. I can only see the 2TB drive, upon
which I installed grub, by hitting F8 and selecting the 1TB drive for
booting.  Now the last time I installed a HD on the system I can't say
as I paid any attention as to which connector each drive was plugged
into.  Hence, the question that started this thread.

As I am strictly a user of computers I am very hesitant to mess around
with the hardware and the BIOS.

let me finish his email by saying that I am most appreciative of the
patience and consideration of most of the users of this list!

--
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D.
Consultant
www.molecular-modeling.net
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Felix Miata-3
In reply to this post by Stephen P. Molnar
Stephen P. Molnar composed on 2018-08-11 11:19 (UTC-0400):

> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.

> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.

> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been a
> friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA ports are
> the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?

Recommended, but not necessary. After a BIOS reset, any HD or SSD plugged into
that port should be recognized as /dev/sda. Putting your preferred boot device
on it might be the easiest way to have an otherwise unrecognized device become
recognized, but you should be able to have it recognized as primary via advanced
BIOS setup regardless.
--
"Wisdom is supreme; therefore get wisdom. Whatever else you
get, get wisdom." Proverbs 4:7 (New Living Translation)

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Shea Alterio
I have not gone thru OP's motherboard manual, but on my HP workstation, the ports are numbered _0 thru _5 and if only one drive is plugged in total then it will be /dev/sda. However if two or more are plugged in then the _0 is sda.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Stephen P. Molnar
In reply to this post by Felix Miata-3

On 08/11/2018 03:17 PM, Felix Miata wrote:

> Stephen P. Molnar composed on 2018-08-11 11:19 (UTC-0400):
>
>> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
>> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been a
>> friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA ports are
>> the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
> Recommended, but not necessary. After a BIOS reset, any HD or SSD plugged into
> that port should be recognized as /dev/sda. Putting your preferred boot device
> on it might be the easiest way to have an otherwise unrecognized device become
> recognized, but you should be able to have it recognized as primary via advanced
> BIOS setup regardless.
This answers my question.

Thanks for the information.

--
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D.
Consultant
www.molecular-modeling.net
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

David Christensen
In reply to this post by Stephen P. Molnar
On 08/11/2018 08:19 AM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:

> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>
> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>
> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been a
> friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA ports are
> the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
>
> Thanks in advance.

On 08/11/2018 10:21 AM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
 > I appreciate the responses. I have looked a the MB Manual and the BIOS
 > in both the easy mode and the advanced mode. (incidentally, the BIOS
 > is current)
 >
 > I have three dives on the platform:
 >
 >   *-cdrom
 >         description: DVD-RAM writer
 >         product: DVDRAM GH24NSB0
 >         vendor: HL-DT-ST
 >         physical id: 0.0.0
 >         bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
 >         logical name: /dev/cdrom
 >         logical name: /dev/cdrw
 >         logical name: /dev/dvd
 >         logical name: /dev/dvdrw
 >         logical name: /dev/sr0
 >         version: LN00
 >         capabilities: removable audio cd-r cd-rw dvd dvd-r dvd-ram
 >         configuration: ansiversion=5 status=nodisc
 >    *-disk
 >         description: ATA Disk
 >         product: ST2000DM006-2DM1
 >         vendor: Seagate
 >         physical id: 0.0.0
 >         bus info: scsi@2:0.0.0
 >         logical name: /dev/sda
 >         version: CC26
 >         serial: Z560Q2JW
 >         size: 1863GiB (2TB)
 >         capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
 >         configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
 > sectorsize=4096 signature=0bc7db76
 >    *-disk
 >         description: ATA Disk
 >         product: WDC WD5000AAKS-0
 >         vendor: Western Digital
 >         physical id: 0.0.0
 >         bus info: scsi@3:0.0.0
 >         logical name: /dev/sdb
 >         version: 3B01
 >         serial: WD-WMASY0223768
 >         size: 465GiB (500GB)
 >         capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
 >         configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
 > sectorsize=512 signature=0003d403
 >
 > I installed the current Debian Version on the 2TB HD as it was new at
 > the time.
 >
 > Unfortunately, the boot sequence on the EZ Mode screen is only shows
 > the WD 500GB drive and the cdrom drive. I can only see the 2TB drive,
 > upon which I installed grub, by hitting F8 and selecting the 1TB drive
 > for booting.  Now the last time I installed a HD on the system I can't
 > say as I paid any attention as to which connector each drive was
 > plugged into.  Hence, the question that started this thread.
 >
 > As I am strictly a user of computers I am very hesitant to mess around
 > with the hardware and the BIOS.
 >
 > let me finish his email by saying that I am most appreciative of the
 > patience and consideration of most of the users of this list!

I will assume that you have one computer, an Internet gateway, and an
Ethernet cable between them.


Hardware can be easy.  Get an anti-static wrist strap and take your
time.  Read the users manual for the various components.  STFW and watch
YouTube videos to learn more.


BIOS can be easy.  Load the defaults and only change those settings
which you have a compelling reason.  Again, learn as required.


Linux, FOSS services and applications, and their myriad settings and
interactions are all never-ending learning curves.


Looking at the motherboard users manual:

http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM3+/M5A97_R2.0/E7438_M5A97_R20_Manual_web_hi-res.pdf

Section 1.2.9, item 4, is titled "Serial ATA 6.0 Gb/s connectors (7-pin
SATA6G 1~6)".  Unfortunately, the motherboard and connector diagram has
been badly pixelated, but the SATA connectors appear to be labeled
SATA6G_1 through SATA6G_6 (?).  Please confirm.


I recommend:

1.  Get a small, fast, high-quality SSD to use as the system drive.
Connect it to motherboard port SATA6G_1.

2.  Connect the optical drive to SATA6G_2.

3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
(10 GB).  Leave the remaining space unused.  This will give you a system
image that can fit on a 16 GB USB flash drive, a 16 GB SDD, or a 25 GB
Blu-ray disc.  The first allows you to carry your desktop in your
pocket, using laptops and PC's as convenient.  The second gives you the
best performance.  The third is for taking archival images.

4.  Connect the 500 GB HDD to SATA6G_3 and the 2 TB drive to SATA6G_4.
Mount the HDD partitions and/or directories as desired.  Adjust owner
and group identifiers as required.

5.  Use the system drive for the operating system, applications, and
carefully-chosen data.  (I keep my e-mail and CVS working directories in
my home directory on the system drive.)  Keep the rest of your data on
the HDD's.


David

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Stephen P. Molnar

On 08/11/2018 04:50 PM, David Christensen wrote:

> On 08/11/2018 08:19 AM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
>> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>>
>> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
>> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>>
>> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been
>> a friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA
>> ports are the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
>>
>> Thanks in advance.
>
> On 08/11/2018 10:21 AM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
> > I appreciate the responses. I have looked a the MB Manual and the BIOS
> > in both the easy mode and the advanced mode. (incidentally, the BIOS
> > is current)
> >
> > I have three dives on the platform:
> >
> >   *-cdrom
> >         description: DVD-RAM writer
> >         product: DVDRAM GH24NSB0
> >         vendor: HL-DT-ST
> >         physical id: 0.0.0
> >         bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
> >         logical name: /dev/cdrom
> >         logical name: /dev/cdrw
> >         logical name: /dev/dvd
> >         logical name: /dev/dvdrw
> >         logical name: /dev/sr0
> >         version: LN00
> >         capabilities: removable audio cd-r cd-rw dvd dvd-r dvd-ram
> >         configuration: ansiversion=5 status=nodisc
> >    *-disk
> >         description: ATA Disk
> >         product: ST2000DM006-2DM1
> >         vendor: Seagate
> >         physical id: 0.0.0
> >         bus info: scsi@2:0.0.0
> >         logical name: /dev/sda
> >         version: CC26
> >         serial: Z560Q2JW
> >         size: 1863GiB (2TB)
> >         capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
> >         configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
> > sectorsize=4096 signature=0bc7db76
> >    *-disk
> >         description: ATA Disk
> >         product: WDC WD5000AAKS-0
> >         vendor: Western Digital
> >         physical id: 0.0.0
> >         bus info: scsi@3:0.0.0
> >         logical name: /dev/sdb
> >         version: 3B01
> >         serial: WD-WMASY0223768
> >         size: 465GiB (500GB)
> >         capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
> >         configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
> > sectorsize=512 signature=0003d403
> >
> > I installed the current Debian Version on the 2TB HD as it was new at
> > the time.
> >
> > Unfortunately, the boot sequence on the EZ Mode screen is only shows
> > the WD 500GB drive and the cdrom drive. I can only see the 2TB drive,
> > upon which I installed grub, by hitting F8 and selecting the 1TB drive
> > for booting.  Now the last time I installed a HD on the system I can't
> > say as I paid any attention as to which connector each drive was
> > plugged into.  Hence, the question that started this thread.
> >
> > As I am strictly a user of computers I am very hesitant to mess around
> > with the hardware and the BIOS.
> >
> > let me finish his email by saying that I am most appreciative of the
> > patience and consideration of most of the users of this list!
>
> I will assume that you have one computer, an Internet gateway, and an
> Ethernet cable between them.
>
>
> Hardware can be easy.  Get an anti-static wrist strap and take your
> time.  Read the users manual for the various components. STFW and
> watch YouTube videos to learn more.
>
>
> BIOS can be easy.  Load the defaults and only change those settings
> which you have a compelling reason.  Again, learn as required.
>
>
> Linux, FOSS services and applications, and their myriad settings and
> interactions are all never-ending learning curves.
>
>
> Looking at the motherboard users manual:
>
> http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM3+/M5A97_R2.0/E7438_M5A97_R20_Manual_web_hi-res.pdf 
>
>
> Section 1.2.9, item 4, is titled "Serial ATA 6.0 Gb/s connectors
> (7-pin SATA6G 1~6)".  Unfortunately, the motherboard and connector
> diagram has been badly pixelated, but the SATA connectors appear to be
> labeled SATA6G_1 through SATA6G_6 (?).  Please confirm.
>
>
> I recommend:
>
> 1.  Get a small, fast, high-quality SSD to use as the system drive.
> Connect it to motherboard port SATA6G_1SATA6G_1.
>
> 2.  Connect the optical drive to SATA6G_2.
>
> 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
> creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
> (10 GB).  Leave the remaining space unused.  This will give you a
> system image that can fit on a 16 GB USB flash drive, a 16 GB SDD, or
> a 25 GB Blu-ray disc.  The first allows you to carry your desktop in
> your pocket, using laptops and PC's as convenient.  The second gives
> you the best performance.  The third is for taking archival images.
>
> 4.  Connect the 500 GB HDD to SATA6G_3 and the 2 TB drive to SATA6G_4.
> Mount the HDD partitions and/or directories as desired. Adjust owner
> and group identifiers as required.
>
> 5.  Use the system drive for the operating system, applications, and
> carefully-chosen data.  (I keep my e-mail and CVS working directories
> in my home directory on the system drive.)  Keep the rest of your data
> on the HDD's.
>
>
> David
>
>

Oh my!
Thank you so very much.  That, in part, is what I am planning on doing.
Certainly attaching the SSD to SATA6G_1. The rest I will decide as I go
along,

--
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D.
Consultant
www.molecular-modeling.net
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Dale Forsyth

From: Stephen P. Molnar <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sunday, 12 August 2018 7:20 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Hrdware question
 

On 08/11/2018 04:50 PM, David Christensen wrote:
> On 08/11/2018 08:19 AM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
>> I am running Debian Stretch on my 64bit Linux platform.
>>
>> I am planning on installing a 500B SSD as the boot HD and have a
>> question about the SATA connectors on the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 MB.
>>
>> I have what I thought was a simple question, but Google has not been
>> a friend to me.  What I found via that route was that the 6 SATA
>> ports are the same.  Should the boot drive be plugged into SATA8G_1?
>>
>> Thanks in advance.
>
> On 08/11/2018 10:21 AM, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
> > I appreciate the responses. I have looked a the MB Manual and the BIOS
> > in both the easy mode and the advanced mode. (incidentally, the BIOS
> > is current)
> >
> > I have three dives on the platform:
> >
> >   *-cdrom
> >         description: DVD-RAM writer
> >         product: DVDRAM GH24NSB0
> >         vendor: HL-DT-ST
> >         physical id: 0.0.0
> >         bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
> >         logical name: /dev/cdrom
> >         logical name: /dev/cdrw
> >         logical name: /dev/dvd
> >         logical name: /dev/dvdrw
> >         logical name: /dev/sr0
> >         version: LN00
> >         capabilities: removable audio cd-r cd-rw dvd dvd-r dvd-ram
> >         configuration: ansiversion=5 status=nodisc
> >    *-disk
> >         description: ATA Disk
> >         product: ST2000DM006-2DM1
> >         vendor: Seagate
> >         physical id: 0.0.0
> >         bus info: scsi@2:0.0.0
> >         logical name: /dev/sda
> >         version: CC26
> >         serial: Z560Q2JW
> >         size: 1863GiB (2TB)
> >         capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
> >         configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
> > sectorsize=4096 signature=0bc7db76
> >    *-disk
> >         description: ATA Disk
> >         product: WDC WD5000AAKS-0
> >         vendor: Western Digital
> >         physical id: 0.0.0
> >         bus info: scsi@3:0.0.0
> >         logical name: /dev/sdb
> >         version: 3B01
> >         serial: WD-WMASY0223768
> >         size: 465GiB (500GB)
> >         capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
> >         configuration: ansiversion=5 logicalsectorsize=512
> > sectorsize=512 signature=0003d403
> >
> > I installed the current Debian Version on the 2TB HD as it was new at
> > the time.
> >
> > Unfortunately, the boot sequence on the EZ Mode screen is only shows
> > the WD 500GB drive and the cdrom drive. I can only see the 2TB drive,
> > upon which I installed grub, by hitting F8 and selecting the 1TB drive
> > for booting.  Now the last time I installed a HD on the system I can't
> > say as I paid any attention as to which connector each drive was
> > plugged into.  Hence, the question that started this thread.
> >
> > As I am strictly a user of computers I am very hesitant to mess around
> > with the hardware and the BIOS.
> >
> > let me finish his email by saying that I am most appreciative of the
> > patience and consideration of most of the users of this list!
>
> I will assume that you have one computer, an Internet gateway, and an
> Ethernet cable between them.
>
>
> Hardware can be easy.  Get an anti-static wrist strap and take your
> time.  Read the users manual for the various components. STFW and
> watch YouTube videos to learn more.
>
>
> BIOS can be easy.  Load the defaults and only change those settings
> which you have a compelling reason.  Again, learn as required.
>
>
> Linux, FOSS services and applications, and their myriad settings and
> interactions are all never-ending learning curves.
>
>
> Looking at the motherboard users manual:
>
> http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM3+/M5A97_R2.0/E7438_M5A97_R20_Manual_web_hi-res.pdf
>
>
> Section 1.2.9, item 4, is titled "Serial ATA 6.0 Gb/s connectors
> (7-pin SATA6G 1~6)".  Unfortunately, the motherboard and connector
> diagram has been badly pixelated, but the SATA connectors appear to be
> labeled SATA6G_1 through SATA6G_6 (?).  Please confirm.
>
>
> I recommend:
>
> 1.  Get a small, fast, high-quality SSD to use as the system drive.
> Connect it to motherboard port SATA6G_1SATA6G_1.
>
> 2.  Connect the optical drive to SATA6G_2.
>
> 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
> creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
> (10 GB).  Leave the remaining space unused.  This will give you a
> system image that can fit on a 16 GB USB flash drive, a 16 GB SDD, or
> a 25 GB Blu-ray disc.  The first allows you to carry your desktop in
> your pocket, using laptops and PC's as convenient.  The second gives
> you the best performance.  The third is for taking archival images.
>
> 4.  Connect the 500 GB HDD to SATA6G_3 and the 2 TB drive to SATA6G_4.
> Mount the HDD partitions and/or directories as desired. Adjust owner
> and group identifiers as required.
>
> 5.  Use the system drive for the operating system, applications, and
> carefully-chosen data.  (I keep my e-mail and CVS working directories
> in my home directory on the system drive.)  Keep the rest of your data
> on the HDD's.
>
>
> David
>
>

Oh my!
Thank you so very much.  That, in part, is what I am planning on doing.
Certainly attaching the SSD to SATA6G_1. The rest I will decide as I go
along,

--
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D.
Consultant
www.molecular-modeling.net
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

deloptes-2
In reply to this post by Stephen P. Molnar
Stephen P. Molnar wrote:

> This answers my question.

Today grub is using uuid to find out which drive it needs to boot from.
On my hobby server I have 8 drives in raid1 and when the storage (LSI) comes
up some times some drives are initialized before others, but using UUID
instead sda, sdb etc makes it work like a charm.

regards

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Pascal Hambourg-2
In reply to this post by David Christensen
Le 11/08/2018 à 22:50, David Christensen a écrit :
>
> 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
> creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
> (10 GB).

Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Dan Ritter-4
On Sun, Aug 12, 2018 at 08:01:08PM +0200, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
> Le 11/08/2018 à 22:50, David Christensen a écrit :
> >
> > 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
> > creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
> > (10 GB).
>
> Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?

It used to be the case that various bootloaders would not be
able to boot from a partition larger than a certain size.

If your root partition is encrypted, or uses an exotic
filesystem, a separate /boot may be needed.

A separate /boot may be used as part of a rescue booting system,
so that you can fix a broken /.

If none of those reasons apply, you can safely have a unified /
and /boot.

-dsr-

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Michael Wagner
In reply to this post by Pascal Hambourg-2
On Aug 12, 2018 at 20:01:08, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
> Le 11/08/2018 à 22:50, David Christensen a écrit :
> >
> > 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
> > creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root (10
> > GB).
>
> Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?
>

Hello Pascal,

when you have /boot on a seperate partition, you can mount it read-only
and only when kernel updates arrives, you mount it read-write.

Michael

--
If you have to ask what jazz is, you'll never know.

signature.asc (923 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

David Christensen
In reply to this post by Pascal Hambourg-2
On 08/12/2018 11:01 AM, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
> Le 11/08/2018 à 22:50, David Christensen a écrit :
>>
>> 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
>> creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
>> (10 GB).
>
> Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?
>

Primarily because I often use dm-crypt on swap and root; boot must be
unencrypted.


David

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

tomas@tuxteam.de
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On Tue, Aug 14, 2018 at 08:36:47PM -0700, David Christensen wrote:

> On 08/12/2018 11:01 AM, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
> >Le 11/08/2018 à 22:50, David Christensen a écrit :
> >>
> >>3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition
> >>manually, creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap
> >>(1 GB), and root (10 GB).
> >
> >Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?
> >
>
> Primarily because I often use dm-crypt on swap and root; boot must
> be unencrypted.

While unencrypted /boot is the most common setup (mine too), you *can*
have encrypted /boot to:

  https://libreboot.org/docs/gnulinux/encrypted_debian.html

Some assembly required :-)

Cheers
- -- tomás
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)

iEYEARECAAYFAltz00sACgkQBcgs9XrR2kbA+ACdF873Ngjv/hV+pc3OMdDyqb5M
FqYAn1+wQCxAlLC7LI92tU6JP4ocnAu2
=to4l
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Pascal Hambourg-2
In reply to this post by David Christensen
Le 15/08/2018 à 05:36, David Christensen a écrit :
> On 08/12/2018 11:01 AM, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
>>
>> Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?
>
> Primarily because I often use dm-crypt on swap and root;

Plain dm-crypt or LUKS ?

> boot must be unencrypted.

Only if using plain dm-crypt. GRUB can handle LUKS encryption on /boot.

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Pascal Hambourg-2
In reply to this post by Michael Wagner
Le 12/08/2018 à 21:38, Michael Wagner a écrit :
> On Aug 12, 2018 at 20:01:08, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
>>
>> Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?
>
> when you have /boot on a seperate partition, you can mount it read-only
> and only when kernel updates arrives, you mount it read-write.

You can do that with other quasi-static parts of the filesystem such as
/usr too. So what's special with /boot which justifies mounting it
read-only more than other parts ?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hrdware question

Pascal Hambourg-2
In reply to this post by Dan Ritter-4
Le 12/08/2018 à 21:27, Dan Ritter a écrit :

> On Sun, Aug 12, 2018 at 08:01:08PM +0200, Pascal Hambourg wrote:
>> Le 11/08/2018 à 22:50, David Christensen a écrit :
>>>
>>> 3.  Do a fresh install of Debian onto the SSD.  Partition manually,
>>> creating three primary partitions: /boot (1 GB), swap (1 GB), and root
>>> (10 GB).
>>
>> Mind to explain why should /boot be on a separate partition ?
>
> It used to be the case that various bootloaders would not be
> able to boot from a partition larger than a certain size.

It used to, in a very distant past. Bootloaders which cannot boot from a
1 GB partition must have long gone.

> If your root partition is encrypted, or uses an exotic
> filesystem, a separate /boot may be needed.
>
> A separate /boot may be used as part of a rescue booting system,
> so that you can fix a broken /.
>
> If none of those reasons apply, you can safely have a unified /
> and /boot.

I know all this and did not ask why may /boot be on a separate partition
*in general* but why should /boot be on a separate partition *in the
specific context of this thread*.

12